Senior Profile: Jenna Dyroff

Photo+by+Malayna+Vines%3B+Art+by+Tatum+Shore-Fitzgerald
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Senior Profile: Jenna Dyroff

Photo by Malayna Vines; Art by Tatum Shore-Fitzgerald

Photo by Malayna Vines; Art by Tatum Shore-Fitzgerald

Photo by Malayna Vines; Art by Tatum Shore-Fitzgerald

Photo by Malayna Vines; Art by Tatum Shore-Fitzgerald

Jonathan Munroe, news features writer

She stands tall in the Jackson County Courthouse delivering her closing statement during the state trial on Sunday, March 31. This is the end of the road for Dyroff, as her high school passion comes to a close. For Dyroff, mock trial means everything.

“It is an experience that requires a lot of courage and confidence that I did not have going into mock trial,” Dyroff said. “Over the last couple of years, through my adult and peer mentors and embarrassing moments of failure in front of everyone, I learned how to make mistakes and be okay with failure. Those are all qualities that shaped me as a person.”

Lucas Ravenscraft, AP U.S. Government teacher, worked with Jenna for four years in the classroom, through Youth and Government and mock trial. Dyroff was on Ravenscraft’s team who won state last year and was the captain of this year’s team that placed second in the state.

“It is almost impossible to look at her and not see her as a respectable, hardworking, honest and genuine person not only in mock trial but in everything she does.”

“She is one of the best young legal minds that I have worked with over the years that I’ve been here,” Ravenscraft said. “I think that not only does she have a good grasp with how the law works, but [she] works super hard. Parents and coaches have come up to me unsolicited after trials and complemented Jenna on her performance more than anyone in the past.”

Annika Kline, junior, is one of Dyroff’s teammates on mock trial and has worked with her for three years. Kline said Dyroff will succeed in anything she does because of how hard she works and the time and dedication she puts into everything.

“She is the type of person who demands respect,” Kline said. “It is almost impossible to look at her and not see her as a respectable, hardworking, honest and genuine person not only in mock trial but in everything she does. She’s a good person to look up to.”

Dyroff plans on continuing her education at The College of Wooster in Wooster, Ohio where she will be majoring in international relations and affairs. She said she chose the school because it was included in The Colleges that Change Lives program and its sense of community.

“What I really like about Kirkwood is that I got to form really close relationships with teachers because they were generally very willing to help and be available,” Dyroff said. “The classes where I had relationships like that with my teachers were the classes I excelled the most in. To extend that into my college education is what I’m really looking forward to. I’m looking for a community in my future and Wooster offers that.”

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