The Kirkwood Call

Recent female shooters defy national trend

Photo courtesy of Wiki Commons under the Google Creative Commons License

Photo courtesy of Wiki Commons under the Google Creative Commons License

Elizabeth Miller, social media staff

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An armed 26-year-old woman opened fire in a Rite Aid Distribution Facility in Harford County, Maryland, leaving three dead and three injured before turning the gun on herself Thursday, Sept. 20, at 9 a.m. She was identified in a tweet as Snochia Mosely, a temporary employee at the facility.

This incident comes almost five months after the shooting at Youtube Headquarters by 30-year-old Nasim Aghdam, who shot three people before taking her own life.

No one can say precisely why there is such a gap between female and male shooters but one explanation, according to Roni Jacobson’s “What Female Mass Shooters Revel about Male Ones,” is that men are more aggressive typically because of environmental aspects. He adds that most men are raised to keep their emotions locked away, which causes them to be overwhelmed and act out physically. According to Caroline Simon of USA TODAY,  there are two primary reasons for the gaping disparity between gun violence committed by men and women.

“Men, in general, are much more violent than women, and that has been well- documented and well recorded. Greater male violence could be traced to a number of factors, such as testosterone,” Laura Dugan, University of Maryland professor of criminology and criminal justice, told Simon in the USA Today.  

Simon also said men are significantly more likely to own guns. Statistics from the Pew Research Center (2017) show that 39 percent of men own a gun, compared to the 22 percent of women.

“We live in a culture that worships men with guns,” Jennifer Wright, a writer for Harper’s Bazaar, said in her article “ Men Are Responsible for Mass Shootings.”

“In many of these mass shootings, the desire to kill seems to be driven by a catastrophic sense of male entitlement. Women lose jobs. Women feel neglected by their loved ones. Women are romantically rejected. But women do not respond by shooting up schools or workplaces.”

 

About the Writer
Elizabeth Miller, social media staff
Interests: Listening to music, playing volleyball, photography, netflixing, taking izzy to Ferguson Favorite food: Chicken tortellini Alfredo Favorite quote: “Occasionally, I’ll hit someone with my car. So sue me.”- Michael Scott If you had to be another call staffer, who would you be and why?: Maggie Burton because she’s super hip
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