Senior Column: Ryan Davidson

Back to Article
Back to Article

Senior Column: Ryan Davidson

photo by Adaline Bray

photo by Adaline Bray

photo by Adaline Bray

Ryan Davidson, editor-in-chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






I always told myself I wouldn’t save this until the last possible moment. Yet, here I am in early April, and I have no idea how to write my senior column.

Should I write about the half court shot I drained first try at a halftime show? Or how about the time I ripped my pants so my underwear was in clear view at a football game (both during freshman year… what a year that was)? While each of these tales, and many more, seem quite enticing, I decided to do what I told myself I wouldn’t: I’m going to attempt to give some advice.

So, here are some things I’ve learned at KHS. But you can take this or leave it, because I probably still don’t know what the hell I’m talking about.

  1. Seniors about to graduate have no idea what they’re doing. You think freshmen are clueless? Try talking to a senior in their last weeks of high school. I have yet to decide where I want to spend the next four years of my life, and what I want to do with them. Underclassmen: right now is the most sure you’ll be of your future for a while.
  2. What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. As cliché as it sounds, it couldn’t be more true. I’m still not sure when I’ll use the dominant themes of Othello or the names of all the Chinese dynasties (Shang, Zhou, Qin, Han, Sui, Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing, in case you were wondering), but because so many of these intellectual challenges pushed me to better my work ethic, I wouldn’t trade what I’d originally thought were useless lectures and assignments for anything.
  3. What you do in high school doesn’t matter as much as who you do it with. Sure, I love journalism, but I’m not entering the field professionally. I primarily joined TKC to expand my skills, and I figured I’d meet some cool people, too. In hindsight, I realize the development of my journalistic abilities have been a drop in the bucket compared to the friendships I’ve made along the way.
  4. Be thankful for everything KHS does for you. There are too many friends, teachers, coaches and mentors here for me to write a proper thanks without penning a full-length novel. They’ve shaped who I am, and the harsh reality that I may never see some of them again after the next few months makes me realize how much they’ve done for me.

If you’re going to take one thing away from this column, here it is: Forget everything I just said. We all have different perspectives, and the world is changing faster than ever. So does my high school experience have any relevance to your life? Probably not, but if it does, I’m flattered. If anything, it means you’re just as clueless as I am. Because in the end, if we were all so sure about our futures, what would be the point of living them out?