Senior Column: Katie Hackett

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Back to Article

Senior Column: Katie Hackett

photo by Abbey Painter

photo by Abbey Painter

photo by Abbey Painter

Katie Hackett, public relations editor

Fact: I have the “insensitivity of a cult leader.” At least that is what the school-issued personality test told me in sophomore year English.

Hearing you have similarities with cult leaders could be crushing for a 15-year-old (cult leaders don’t have the greatest reputation.)”

Hearing you have similarities with cult leaders could be crushing for a 15-year-old (cult leaders don’t have the greatest reputation.) However, how could I take this personality test seriously? This test didn’t know what type of day I was having, nor did it even know my name.

But you know what? Thank you, test. Thank you for teaching me to not take myself too seriously. Thank you for encouraging me to always have a fun fact to share on the first day of school. Thank you for encouraging me to join clubs and find a job I love, one that happens to be outside the penitentiary system, which is surprising because you told me that would be a “strong” career.  Having the insensitivity of a cult leader isn’t really that bad. In fact, it has help build my confidence.

Cult leaders get things done. Granted, it’s rarely for good. They get things done through two important steps. One, gathering followers (haven’t figured this one out yet). Two, by ignoring the people who call them crazy. If I based all my decisions on what other people think of me, I wouldn’t be living. I would have never tried out for a field hockey and lacrosse, joined DECA, applied for Call, played for Cooper’s Hoopers or met some of the greatest people I know. I now approach a situation to learn more about yourself, not to appear “normal.” No one is going to remember that time you wore overalls freshman year.

Join everything you can or it will always sit in the back of your mind. Better yet, start something: a band, a club, a recreational basketball team or whatever will make you happy. While this is my personal bias, I recommend joining a recreational basketball team. If I took myself and school too seriously, I could’ve never brought myself to commit one hour every Sunday to basketball. As a non-athlete, I should have been nervous to start a team full of my peers and be afraid of embarrassing myself in front of them. However, I got involved and couldn’t be happier with my decision. Every Sunday, I had an hour of pure happiness. I’m not sure if my favorite part was only playing eight minutes a game or the attitude that my team of 18 carried with them.

Stop sitting in class thinking “I’m too young to do an amazing things”. Instead just get up and do it. So, if I have any advice… don’t drink the kool-aid.

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