PERMITTED USE: This image may be downloaded or is otherwise provided at no charge for one-time use for coverage or promotion of National Geographic TEDxDeExtinction Event and the National Geographic magazine feature dated April 2013. No copying, distribution or archiving permitted.  Sublicensing, sale or resale is prohibited. REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by the provided caption. Any uses in which the image appears without photographer credit and a caption referencing NGM and/or TEDxDeExtinction are subject to paid licensing. You MUST follow these requirements if using the images: 1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image 2. Show the April cover of National Geographic somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic) 3. Provide a prominent link to www.nationalgeographic.com/deextinction 4. Reference the April issue of National Geographic magazine somewhere in the piece. Extinct Species That Could be Brought Back – from the NG DeExtinction site 007: Photo by Jonathan S. Blair/National Geographic A museum worker inspects a replica of a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), a species that went extinct 3,000 to 10,000 years ago. In March 2012, scientists in Russia and South Korea announced a partnership to try to clone the mammoth and generate a living specimen (photo courtesy of National Geographic)
PERMITTED USE: This image may be downloaded or is otherwise provided at no charge for one-time use for coverage or promotion of National Geographic TEDxDeExtinction Event and the National Geographic magazine feature dated April 2013. No copying, distribution or archiving permitted.  Sublicensing, sale or resale is prohibited. REQUIRED CREDIT AND CAPTION: All image uses must be properly credited to the relevant photographer, as shown in this metadata, and must be accompanied by the provided caption. Any uses in which the image appears without photographer credit and a caption referencing NGM and/or TEDxDeExtinction are subject to paid licensing. You MUST follow these requirements if using the images: 1. Include mandatory photo credit with each image 2. Show the April cover of National Geographic somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic) 3. Provide a prominent link to www.nationalgeographic.com/deextinction 4. Reference the April issue of National Geographic magazine somewhere in the piece. Extinct Species That Could be Brought Back – from the NG DeExtinction site 007: Photo by Jonathan S. Blair/National Geographic A museum worker inspects a replica of a woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), a species that went extinct 3,000 to 10,000 years ago. In March 2012, scientists in Russia and South Korea announced a partnership to try to clone the mammoth and generate a living specimen

photo courtesy of National Geographic

Mammoth madness

April 27, 2015

Most people have seen Jurassic Park, but if you haven’t, here’s a quick run down.

A bunch of phoney science is used to mix insect DNA with dinosaur DNA, and this full set is used to make modern living dinos.Wooly-mammoth-blood

This, then, is used for a possible theme park that goes horribly wrong and ends in around 3 deaths, because, duh, don’t reanimate dinosaurs.

Anyways, bringing back long-extinct species has long been the stuff of science-fiction, but may soon become a reality.

Hwang Woo-Suk is a genetics specialist, who once falsely claimed he had cloned human stem cells, but now he has a new plan.

One thing that was correct in Jurassic Park was that you need a complete DNA strand for it to work. This is where cloning mammoths usually falls short.

Not so much, this time.

Woo-Suk thinks if you splice elephant DNA with mammoth DNA, you can create a full strand and clone a mammoth/elephant hybrid.

Two important things have recently happened that have been huge steps forward for this goal.

First, a 40,000-year-old mammoth nicknamed “Buttercup” was found oozing blood in Maly Lyakhovsky, Siberia. Apparently, when scientists cut into the carcass, Buttercup started bleeding. The blood provided long strands of DNA, although no complete ones.

The kicker came when George Church, geneticist at Harvard University, succeeded in splicing the elephant and mammoth DNA.

Now, this doesn’t mean we’ll be seeing mammoths roam the earth anytime soon, but it’s the closest anyone has ever gotten. Steven Spielberg’s science fiction has become a very likely reality.

(Photo courtesy of Popular Science)

 

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




The Kirkwood Call • Copyright 2020 • FLEX WordPress Theme by SNOLog in