Student newspaper of Kirkwood High School.

The Kirkwood Call

How to survive: the activity overload

Anna Broderson

Anna Broderson

Ian Madden, opinions writer

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From teachers who forget they aren’t the only ones tossing out homework, to those friends who seem to have nothing better to do than text hourly hang-out invitations, students today have a lot on their plate. Prioritization can help wash away unnecessary gunk and enable students to revel in all the experiences KHS has to offer.

An easy way to start the prioritizing scrub is by dividing responsibilities into two categories: primary and secondary. Clubs are an excellent example of when this concept can be applied. Some clubs like the school productions and sports teams require more of a commitment than others and should always be primary. Other clubs dedicated to socialization should be secondary.

Hanging out with friends is a special case. Most of the time, social outings are secondary. However, if it’s been a few weeks since a social event, arranging one should be a primary task. And just remember, unless your sole ambition is to live in a tent and traverse the country as an actor in the renaissance fair, school work should always be primary.

If it’s impossible to finish every homework assignment at night, try getting up early to work on some assignments in the morning or finishing several during lunch. Even attempt to make a schedule and plan how to get everything done, but make sure to schedule at least one hour of relaxation time and eight hours for sleeping, because despite whatever objections the stressed mind might conjure up, it actually is important to sleep. However, clocking in eight hours of slumber may be unrealistic at times.

On those days when the pile of assignments stretches to the ceiling, it’s midnight and life seems hopeless, sit back and take a power nap for 90 minutes. The increased productivity after waking up will make those 90 minutes completely worthwhile.

Although honors and Advanced Placement (AP) courses offer a tempting GPA boost, the boost comes at a price. AP and honors courses are more difficult and require a greater commitment. While taking a limited amount of honors courses can be beneficial, taking an excessive amount has often been linked to first-name basis relationships with Starbucks employees, vivid chase dreams involving murderous, bloodthirsty teachers, and the compulsive, unconscious muttering of random facts during casual conversation or while walking down hallways.

High school is a whirlpool and it’s easy to drown, but prioritization and organization are the greatest life preservers. Not only are they always waiting nearby in case you start to sink, but if you keep holding onto them, you’ll never go under again.

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Student newspaper of Kirkwood High School.
How to survive: the activity overload