KHS holds intruder drill Nov. 3

Students+gather+away+from+the+classroom+door+after+barricading+it+with+desks.+

Marilynn Steuby

Students gather away from the classroom door after barricading it with desks.

KHS held an intruder drill during second hour on Wed., Nov 3. This drill was planned, not a response to the intruder on campus Nov. 2. At 10:30 a.m., KHS principal Dr. Mike Havener announced over the intercom that the drill was starting. Teachers were instructed to check CrisisGo, an app that allows KHS staff to stay in contact and post updates about the location of an intruder. Assistant principal Stephanie Owens monitored the north hallway, checking that students and teachers complied with instructions and remained quiet. 

“[Classrooms] need to be dark, doors need to be covered and [students] need to be in the farthest corner from the door so that an intruder would not be able to see them,” Owens said. “An intruder would know that students are in classrooms, but we want to make it as least [obvious] as possible.” 

Owens checked several classrooms that did not follow the correct procedure. Multiple doors were unlocked and students could be seen through the window on the doors. 

“This was not our best [drill],” Owens said. [Intruder drills] are something we definitely need to practice as far as the exact safety measures that need to be [followed].”

[Intruder drills] are something we definitely need to practice as far as the exact safety measures that need to be [followed].””

— Stephanie Owens

Although the drill did not run as smoothly as administration had hoped, teachers felt that it was still beneficial for their students. According to Matt Stoner, history teacher, his class followed procedure correctly and efficiently. 

“My freshmen took it seriously and were very cooperative,” Stoner said. “You can never simulate an [event of an intruder], but practicing is still [beneficial].

According to Havener, the drill was proof that students need more practice with intruder drills. The intruder who was arrested on campus on Tuesday, Nov. 2 served as a reminder that this type of event can occur at any time. 

“We found some areas that we need to focus on and improve,” Havener said. “[Students] need to understand that when we go on lockdown, it can last [anywhere from] five, 10, 30 minutes. [Procedures] still need to be followed to ensure that everyone is safe.”

[Students] need to understand that when we go on lockdown, it can last [anywhere from] five, 10, 30 minutes.”

— Mike Havener

Students remained in their classrooms for the drill on Nov. 3. According to Havener, students will practice exiting the building during future intruder drills. 

“You have to train your mind, so if something were to happen, your body knows how to react,” Havener said. “Hopefully a real situation [will never occur], but it’s important to be prepared.”